QuiltCon 2020 Sashiko Workshop

QuiltCon 2020 Sashiko Workshop

This is a notice blog article for the participants of the QuiltCon 2020 Sashiko Workshop in Austin, Texas on 21st and 22nd of February 2020. Since I am not familiar with being part of the big fair like QuiltCon, I may be a bit clumsy in terms of administrative work. I will do my best to meet your expectations before the workshop. I am preparing everything I can to go beyond your expectations in the workshop. I am looking forward to meeting you with the Sashiko friends in the Southern part of the U.S.

*The QuiltCon 2020 Sashiko Workshop (Sashiko Mastery by Atsushi Futatsuya) are all sold out. Please contact QuiltCon if you would like to be on the waiting list. I have no control over the participation list.


A Material Kit for QuiltCon 2020 Sashiko Workshop

All of the participants are required to have the material kit, which Atsushi prepares for the workshop specifically. The kits are in the preparation process in Japan and waiting to be imported to the U.S. toward the end of this year. Please give us a bit more time to complete our preparation. Thank you for your concern & understanding of the situation.

We will make a purchase page for the Material Kit during the holiday. Please expect a notification from me (or QuiltCon Admin) to complete the purchase. I will make sure to complete the preparation before the end of January 2020 and will send you a link to purchase.

I am still developing the workshop-flow with thinking about what is the best way to deliver the basic and core of Sashiko. It would be very helpful if you could let me know what is your expectation in learning Sashiko by filling out the Google Form Below. It is not mandatory at all. It is purely for the purpose of me understanding the participants’ expectation.

Google Form – QuiltCon 2020 Sashiko Workshop

If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact me through this website – Contact Atsushi. I will keep updating this blog post toward the event day of Feb. 21st and 22nd.


Important Note:

Items needed on site of Quiltcon 2020

The complete kit will be available on our website for the students on https://upcyclestitches.com/store at the end of December 2020. I will notify you in many ways such as notification from QuiltCon 2020 and our own mailing list.

  • 1 skein of Sashiko thread, 145 meters
  • 1 Sashiko thimble
  • 3 Sashiko needles
  • Fabrics with the pattern printed on for the workshop with other fabric to make a tote bag
  • 1 Thread bobbin Paper
  • 1 PinCushion Kit
  • 8 Sashiko patterns (PDF) (will be sent after the workshop)


Other Required tools and/or supplies:

Please bring yours to the workshop – we will use Fabric Scissors and Scotch Tape only once in the workshop, but necessary. You may need a threader and/or magnifying glass to thread the needle. I will share the wisdom to make it easy. A set of required tools can be purchased in addition to the complete kit above.

  • Fabric Scissors
  • Threader (and/or magnifying glass) 
  • Scotch Tape

If the participant has beautiful nails, they may want to bring fake fingernails or some types of tape to protect the nail from scratching by the needle. In a process of learning the Sashiko posture, you may scratch the nail a bit.


Preparation for the Sashiko Workshop

This workshop requires NO Previous Sashiko Experience and no preparation for the actual workshop. However, as a preview of the Sashiko Workshop, it may be a good idea to watch some of Atsushi’s Youtube Video to get familiar with what you are getting into.

Please check the Youtube Channel – Sashi. Co-channel – for more information.

 

See you in QuiltCon 2020 Sashiko Workshop

Sashiko Frequently Asked Questions Cover

Sashiko Frequently Asked Questions

Since I started introducing Sashiko online (here and Youtube)in 2017, I have been receiving many questions. As a group of Sashiko artists, we would like to provide all the answers and solutions regarding Sashiko. To achieve the goal, please take a look at this list of Sashiko Frequently Asked Questions. I have been receiving similar questions, and your question is probably someone’s question. I will keep updating this list of Sashiko Frequently Asked Questions

[last updated in 2019]

Sashiko Frequently Asked Questions

Please find your question and the answer to that below. If you do not find the answer, please contact Atsushi for more information. I will add your question to the list to make an answer.

About Sashiko Supply and Tools


What kind of thread can I use for Sashiko Stitching?

Frankly speaking, you can use ANY KIND of thread for Sashiko stitching. However, in order to fully enjoy the Sashiko experience we would like to introduce, please consider getting the Sashiko thread from us. Some of the technique and wisdom do not function when you use non-Sashiko thread or even the Sashiko thread from the other manufacturers.

This is one of the most frequent questions. Please find the article explaining about the Sashiko Thread.

I also explain “Why” Sashiko thread is so important on Youtube. It is because of the purpose of the thread, not only the quality but the thread itself have a different purpose in stitching.


What kind of fabric should I use?

To be honest, any kinds of fabric would be fine for Sashiko stitching. I prefer the good quality cotton 100% fabric, preferably woven in the Japanese traditional style. However, any kinds of fabric, silk, canvas, and anything else you have in your house may work as a good Sashiko fabric.

For some tips, if I had the same budget, I would spend it toward the thread. The appropriate Sashiko thread makes a lot of difference in the result.

Please find the video of me enjoying the “cheapest fabric” that I can get from the retailer.


What are the recommendation for books?

There are many good books about Sashiko available in English. However, unfortunately, I do not know a book which covers the principal, philosophy, and techniques comprehensively. Therefore, I keep writing our principal, philosophy, and techniques here to share the Sashiko we practice.

If you read Japanese, then the recommendation would be books written by Ms. Eiko Yoshida.


Sashiko Stories


What is the difference between Boro and Sashiko?

Sashiko is a form of hand-stitching (=process), and the Boro is an ultimate result of repeating Sashiko. The definition of each word, Sashiko and Boro, can be wide-interpreted, but Sashiko and Boro are not equal. In the Japanese language, Sashiko can be a verb, but Boro doesn’t work as the verb.

More information can be found on Youtube Video.


Sashiko Wisdom


What is Sashiko? Your Sashiko looks different from mine.

It is a whole purpose of this website to introduce the Sashiko we enjoy. For the quick start, please watch the Youtube video here.


Which side of the fabric should I draw/transfer pattern on?

Traditionally, we draw/transfer the pattern on the “hiding” side. The “hiding” side can be called “wrong side” or “bad side”. In short, we transfer the fabric on the side people will not look at much. The finished side will be on the other side of stitching. However, there is no rule for that. You can stitch from either side. I simply follow the tradition, and the Japanese traditionally performed Sashiko from the “hiding” side because they wanted to both side beautiful (presentable) in a poor economic situation.


Why do you make loops during the stitching?

This is one of the most frequently asked questions from our Youtube Channel. I understand it because I often make loops when I make stitching in Live Streaming. I wrote a blog post about it to share the reasons for loops.


What do you do with the thread tale & loops after Sashiko.

We stitch from the back side (wrong side = hiding side with lining) fabric. All of the thread tales from the Kasane (Overlay stitching) and loops are going to be on the back side you are looking at.

We clip all of the thread tales and loops after the stitching & putting the fabric into the water. By doing Kasane, when you use the appropriate thread, the stitches will be secured in a process of putting the fabric through the water and drying it.

When we plan to use both side as the finished side, we clip all the Sashiko thread tales and loops (In fact, when we use both side as the finish side, I do not leave the loops). However, it is more common to put lining on the back side, so we leave some amount of thread tales and loops.


How do you stop the stitches without a knot?

There is no problem of making a knot when you end the stitching with Sashiko. However, traditionally, we do not make a knot to secure the stitching. Please find a video of “how to NOT to make a knot.”


My fingers and wrist hurt after making the stitch. Is it normal?

Umm… the pain isn’t normal. I can keep on stitching for hours of times and will not have any pains on my finger or wrist. Please check my actual stitching, and see what is the difference. If you can take my workshop (In NYC or Online), I should be able to give you more specific solution.


In order to grasp the quick overview of Sashiko, Youtube videos are the best way. I have been creating some videos explaining what Sashiko can do, so please take a moment to watch the Sashiko “Stories”.

Sashiko and Animism

Inspiring handmade Sashiko Artwork

Thanks to the customised workshop participants from NYC, we have numbers of great photos of our Sashiko Artwork. It is our dream to have an exhibition in a big city so many people can enjoy the beauty of these inspiring all handmade Sashiko artwork. Until we can visit your city and have the exhibition, please enjoy our Sashiko on the images.

 

 

All the posts about Sashiko Artwork

Hitomezashi Sashiko

Hitomezashi Sashiko | What is the difference?

As of 2018, I mainly offer 2 kinds of workshops. One is Sashiko Stitching Workshop (Basic & Core) to share ...
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Sashiko Jacket 2nd 5

Sashiko Jacket 2nd | Description of Sashiko Jackets

Sashiko artworks produced by Sashi.Co & Keiko Futatsuya are mostly "one-of-a-kind" products. We use the vintage fabric from 1900's (sometimes ...
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Sashiko Jacket 1st 5

Sashiko Jacket 1st | Description of Sashiko Jackets

We have a few Sashiko Jackets that Keiko is happy to release in the market. Since Keiko and her company ...
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Sashiko Bag 1st | Description of Sashiko Bags

Here is the Sashiko Bag 1st Descriptions ...
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Sashiko Stitched Fabric

Sashiko Stitched Fabric from our acheivement

We have been practicing Sashiko stitching for more than 30 years. The founder of Sashi.Co, Keiko Futatsuya, has 33 years of Sashiko experience and some of her friends (Sashi.Co member) have even more years of experience. I have about 8 years of experience. Well, I was born in Sashiko family, so I started holding a needle when I was a child to “practice” Sashiko. In these years, we accomplished many Sashiko projects and created many Sashiko Stitched Fabric.

 

A size of  big enough to keep Sashiko stitched fabric

Let’s say, in order to make a jacket, we first trim the fabric and stitch Sashiko. Then, we cut the fabric based on the dress pattern (jacket pattern) to tailor them. In the process of tailoring, we have some leftovers. Leftovers are as valuable as the fabric we used for the project, so we do not throw them away. We keep it for the next project. The Japanese in past used to say, “if we have a size of fabric, large enough to wrap three soybeans, we would keep it.” In current society, the small fabric (or fragment) may not be as useful as before. Well, however, we kind of keep them anyway. We are proud of following the tradition and respecting the concept of ancestors although we may be just a type of hoarders.

 

We kept a pile of good Sashiko stitched fabric. Most of them are the type of vintage fabrics.

When we started to share the Sashiko technique, culture and mindset, we decided to provide this valuable fabric to someone who can share and appreciate the same concepts. Finally, I got enough time to introduce one by one, arranging a small pile of Sashiko stitched fabric.

 

Here is a list of articles about Sashiko stitched fabric available online.

Since most of the items is one of a kind product, we listed them on Etsy store. You can view them on our Etsy store, too.

Boro Inspired Cover

Sashiko Swatches Collection 5th | #50 Boro Inspired

Here is our 5th Collection of Sashiko Swatches for sale. Memorable #50 are so-called "Boro Inspired" Sashiko stitched Fabric. They ...
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Sashiko Swatches Collection 4th

Sashiko Swatches Collection 4th | #015 ~ #019

One of our Sashiko Stitched Swatches is sold out. We are so happy to share these beautiful all-hand-made pieces of ...
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Sashiko Swatches Collection Preview

Sashiko Swatches Collection Third | #007 ~ #014

We have been adding the Sashiko Swatches to the Etsy Store. I feel like I am making a Sashiko Swatches ...
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Sashiko Swatches second

Sashiko Swatches Second | #004 ~ #006

By arranging the Sashiko Swatches inventory, I come to learn how Sashiko is/was. The combination of Japanese vintage fabric and Sashiko ...
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Sashiko Swatches | #001 ~ #003

Upcycle Stitches / Sashi.Co & Keiko Futatsuya are a group of Sashiko artisans and craftspersons. Usually, we have a plan ...
Read More

 

 

Ideas of enjoying the piece of Sashiko fabric

I love these Sashiko stitched fabrics since they are the best material for mending project. The vintage fabric with strengthing by Sashiko is always a good idea to repair my garment beautifully. I hope you would be able to find your favorite fabric for your favorite fashion item.

 

Sashiko Stitched Fabric Jeans

 

Also, our customer shared a nice idea of its usage. 

After trimming the edge of the fabric, then put it in a frame. It would be a nice wall decoration. It could be a part of quilting or/and patchworking project.

 

If you have done any Sashiko project by using our Sashiko Stitched fabric, please share your idea with us. I would love to introduce it on this website. People would love your work and ideas!

BORO | Textile Art from Ancient Japan

Every time I host a Sashiko workshop in NYC, I hear the word of BORO.

The word of “BORO” became famous in these 15 years or so. People in the art industry discovered the beauty of Japanese vintage fabric, especially those were used and repaired repeatedly. As a Japanese who grew up with a lot of textile in the traditional Sashiko family, I remember the trend with BORO was somewhat surprising.

 

In Japanese, the word Boro (襤褸)means;

  1. A piece of useless fabric after using repeatedly
  2. Torn cloth with holes and patches. Squalid garment. (Usually, the negative image with the word of Boro)

The Japanese sometimes call it Ranru with the same Japanese written character. Ranru means a garment with many damages, tears, and patches.

 

The contemporary BORO culture spotlight not only the ordinary Japanese definition as old garments but also the vintage fabrics with many patches and repairs. Many Boro pieces are found in forms of Kimono, Noragi  (Japanese style outer Jacket), Futon (Japanese style blanket), Shikimono (Japanese style rug) and so on. They look dirty comparing to the new fabric, but the color created by hundreds of years of time and the combination of patches with repairing are beautiful. BORO sometimes looks like an abstract painting.

 

Boro 1 Boro 2

 

 

 

At Random Beauty?

Some people say that Boro is a product of at random chance. The people found out the beauty in Boros in the 21 century. It was lucky for the textile culture of Japan that the BORO was discovered. The unique culture of Japan, such as Mottainai (regret concerning waste) contributed to the process of creating Boros. 

Yes. The Japanese had a unique culture of saving and appreciating not only the fabric but also everything around them. Speaking of Mottainai culture in fabric, a mother told a daughter that, if she has a large piece of fabric enough to wrap 3 soybeans, she should keep the piece so she will be able to repair the other fabric. In the process of economical growth in Japan, some Boros were thrown away because of its nature… it is literally a piece of filthy, useless, and fragile fabric. I agree that the Japanese didn’t introduce the artistic aspect in Boros. However, I do not think that the BORO is a product of at random chance or accidental art. They tried to be beautiful.

Boro is Designed fabric by ordinary farmers.

I think, and I know, that the process of creating Boro requires a lot of thinking and designing. If Japanese people only needed to mend the fabric, why didn’t they use mono-color thread and plain solid color fabric…? Using simple thread and one colored fabric throughout their life would have their family finance much easier. Instead, they designed the Boro to enjoy her/him more fashion in their limited resource.

The ordinary farmers in Japan tried to enjoy the fashion and arts within the capacity of what they can. This is human nature to dress their up. The fashion sense of Japanese people is the origin of Boros, I believe.

Boro 3 Boro 4

BORO as the result of Sashiko

The Japanese people created BORO by repeating the process of mending the fabric. I believe that we call the process of mending “Sashiko.” Sashiko is not only a form of hand-stitching but also the process of stitching with focusing on design and function simultaneously.

Many people are interested in Sashiko as a technique to make decorative stitching. Sashiko became more decorative stitching after the Japanese started enjoying enough amount of fabrics and threads. However, as a Sashiko artist, I would like to introduce the beauty of mending, and the aspect of Sashiko which can make your garments more special.

 

My mother Keiko started the project called Sashi.Co & Keiko Futatsuya to revive the old fabric to contemporary fashion/art by Sashiko. It is impossible to make “new BORO” in this century because the BORO requires the color fade-out with hundreds of years and repeated repairing the fabric. What Keiko focus now is to find the Boro (or Boro like, vintage, and antique fabric) and repair the BORO. We believe this is one of our responsibilities to pass down the culture to next generation as Sashiko artists.

Learn Sashiko, share your Sashiko project, and let’s enjoy Boro-like fashion starting in 21st century.

 

Boro 6 Boro 5

 

 

 

We are a team to make Boro-to-be in the next Century.

One of my goal of this website is to make Sashiko open-source matter. I want as many people as possible to know what Sashiko is, enjoy the process of stitching, and feel satisfied by the result. We have some online tutorials and online store to start learning Sashiko.

The Sashiko doesn’t limit your project by rules or regulation. You can do whatever you want. My hobby is to mend jeans, and many people enjoyed my Sashiko mending workshop in NYC.

 

 

By the way, when I say I wear a garment with mending, people may think that I am against to the mass consumption society.

They may think I care the ecology more than the fashion. Some may think I am in need of… and saving money for food. It is wrong. Again, I believe it is human instinct to make us attractive throughout fashion, and the mending with cool fabric can be a good way to attract the others. I am proud of my ancestor, who cared the fashion no matter how in need they were.

 

I hope you can join our team to make “Boro to be” in the next century.

Although I don’t know if our descendants find it beautiful or not, as long as we enjoy the process of appreciating the fabric, I am pretty sure this trend will be another fashion culture in 2xxx. 

 

What you need to join our team are simple of two mindsets.

Passion for the fashion and appreciation for the fabric.

 

Sashiko Thread | The key of good Sashiko

In order to cook a tasty meal, you would need fresh & quality ingredients. Similarly, in order to complete a beautiful Sashiko project, the quality Sashiko thread is the key to succeeding. Not only the good Sashiko thread provide the better stitching result, but it reduces your stress while stitching. Sashiko requires a lot of time to invest. Less stress while stitching hugely contribute to the better result.

 

sashiko thread

 

What kind of Sashiko thread should we choose?

The thread should be strong enough to strengthen the fabric. It should be thick enough to create beautiful stitches. It should be smooth so the thread wouldn’t damage the fabric. The tight twisting thread will reduce the richness of stitching. The loose twisting thread will tear apart while stitching and it will cause stress. Finding the balanced twist is one of the most important factors in finding the best thread. When you get cheap and poor quality Sashiko thread, the thread will fray easily and will be cut in actual stitching process.

 

Choosing the appropriate thread is one good journey many Sashiko artists encounter. We, as Sashiko artists, came to the conclusion to what is the best Sashiko Thread.

 

Sashiko Thread with our choice.

Japanese thread manufacture, Coron Seishi, makes one of the best Sashiko threads in the market. The thread satisfies most of the requirements Sashiko artist thinks, and the result is very rewarding. Almost 100% of Sashiko products from Sashi.Co & Keiko Futatsuya and Upcycle Stitches LLC use these Sashiko threads from Coron.

 

Sashiko Thread 2

 

 

The thread consists 4 rich embroidery flosses, twisted in a unique way to keep the thickness for beautiful stitches, yet tightness to avoid separating the thread while stitching. This is the balance I mentioned above. Coron also put the thread in a series of special processes so thread becomes smooth and soft.

In our online store, we have 4 kinds of Sashiko thread available for sale. Two of them are from Sashi.Co & Keiko Futatsuya (Colored and directed by Keiko / the thread is manufactured by Coron.) Two of them are from Coron manufactory (Colored synthetically and manufactured by Coron).

 

Natural Dye Sashiko Thread

Sashiko Thread Natural Dye

When Keiko Futatsuya started working on her own Sashiko projects, which were mainly “one-of-a-kind” Sashiko Jackets and bags, she faced to the big challenge of finding the exact color she wanted to use. She wanted to adjust the color to the fabric, especially those from the past, the Japanese vintage (antique) fabric. We had a good variety of colored Sashiko thread. However, she couldn’t compromise on what she wanted.

This is her journey of natural dye thread started.

Now, we have about 30 kinds of colors. Some were sold-out and will not be back in stock since the color was so unique (made by random conditions she can not recreate). She is getting better and better at creating Natural Dye Sashiko thread.

 

 

Sashiko Thread Natural Dye
Blue is a very challenging color to dye. (by Logwood)

The process of dyeing the thread with Natural dye has a lot of stories. It is my hope to keep introducing her journey in this website.

Articles about Natural Dye Sashiko Thread

 

Beautiful Indigo Blue and Kakishibu Gold are available in Sashiko Thread Collection, finally.

 

Kakishibu Dyed Thread Natural Indigo Dyed Thread Bobbin

 

I hope you would have a chance to enjoy the beautiful color of Natural, hand-dye Sashiko thread.

 

 

Original Color (Exclusive) Sashiko Thread

Sashiko Thread

 

In the process of Natural Dye and Hand Dye, Keiko only can create about 15 skeins. The production result is between 10 skeins to 20 skeins because of the skeins do not meet her standard. She realized it takes too long to dye the thread when she works on the big Sashiko project.

After talking to a color specialist and Coron, she succeeded to create these 2 colors thread. They are dyed by synthetic dyes like the other solid color thread. However, they have a warm/natural like color similar to our natural dye thread.

They are exclusive colors Keiko ordered. It is Sashi.Co original Sashiko thread.

 

 

Mono Color / Solid Color Sashiko Thread

Sashiko Thread Mono Color

Coron Seishi manufacture these beautiful Sashiko threads. “#10 – Original (unbleached) White” and “#12 – Bright (bleached) white” is the all-time popular item. We use A LOT of these threads in our Sashiko project. The smoothness, the thickness, and the strength of threads improve the stitching experience and color and cotton quality will result in great stitches.

There are 15 colors for solid mono color thread. Every color is available in our online store, etsy, and even on Amazon.

 

 

Variegated Color Sashiko Thread

Variegated Color threads are also very popular for those who enjoys the gradation of colors in their Sashiko projects. We have 5 color variations.

  • #201 – Prime color variation
  • #202 – Pastel color variation
  • #203 – Read to White gradation
  • #204 – Green to White gradation
  • #205 – Blue to White gradation

 

 

Sashiko Variegated Color

 

As a summary for your Sashiko experience

It is very critical to choose the appropriate Sashiko thread to your Sashiko project. As I mention repeatedly, Sashiko requires you to invest a lot of your time. I really want you to get rewarded by having the great Sashiko stitches and finished products. I believe sharing the beauty of Sashiko stitching and its fun process is the best way to introduce Sashiko to the world.

 

Enjoy Sashiko!

Sashiko Mending Gathering

Mending Jeans and Garments with Sashiko

I started providing Sashiko workshops in NYC in 2017. I was happily surprised so many people were interested in Sashiko stitching. At the same time, I learned that “upcycle and repurpose culture” for garments is getting so big and popular along to the keyword of Sashiko. Many people asked me if I can repair denim, and the requests encouraged me to offer mending jeans workshop in NYC. Mending jeans with Sashiko stitching was simply my personal hobby, and now it gets attention.

 

I am happy to share what I do.

In this website, Upcycle Stitches LLC shares some of our Sashiko mending/repairing projects.

 

Sashiko Mending
A photo of Boro Jacket. The result of repeating Sashiko Mending

 

What do you need for mending Jeans

Mending and repairing denim fabric requires several good quality tools. It is simply a hand-stitching process, so you can use any types of hand-sewing needle, thimble, and thread. However, we strongly recommend getting a good quality one. Otherwise, you may waste your time and damage the garment you love. If you would like to do the work we are doing in this website, please get the supplies and tools from our online store. It can protect you from the detour you may end up with by getting the inappropriate tools and supplies.

 

For Sashiko, we strongly recommend using tools specifically designed for Sashiko. Here is a list of the reason.

  • Sashiko (刺し子) is a Japanese word which means “mending garment by stitching” developed in Japan a couple hundred years ago. It is my understanding of Sashiko, but I believe my definition of Sashiko is pretty accurate. Sashiko is a good technique to repair the fabric.
  • Tools and Supplies for Sashiko have all the requirement to complete the mending with good results.
    • Sashiko needles are strong enough to stitch through several layers of fabric, even with new denim.
    • Sashiko thread is thick and strong enough to hold the patches or make fabric stronger. The thickness will result in beautiful stitches. If you would like to hide the stitches, you may use thin thread… but I also recommend you to use a sewing machine.
    • Sashiko thimble and its appropriate way of using will speed up your stitching. Also, it will give you better even stitches, which result in beautiful appearance.

 

Please refe tor another article about Sashiko tools.

Mending Jeans

 

Type of mending can Sashiko offer

 

 

Patch over the Sashiko and/or Vintage Kofu Fabric over the damaged Area.

Patch the Sashiko and/or Vintage Kofu Fabric from the backside of torn fabric or the hole. I prefer this method.

 

You may cut some of the non-damaged garments and then patchwork with Sashiko swatches. I wouldn’t call it “Boro” but it certainly is the upcycling and repurposing process.

 

Sashiko’s original purpose was to make fabric stronger. We occasionally perform Sashiko stitching directly on the used denim. The more fabric get stronger, the longer you may wear.

 

 

 

More Articles about each project of mending jeans and garments

Here is a list of past projects.

I included the article about the Sashiko stitching to reinforce the fabric and to decorate the garment.

 

Sashiko Boro Knots Cover

Sashiko Boro Knots and more | Follow-up Video

I summarized the wisdom of "Sashiko Overlay stitching (not making knots in Sashiko)" in the previous blog post. I tried ...
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Modern Denim Fashion 2

Modern Denim Fashion with Japanese Sashiko

The word of Sashiko is getting popular in many industries, even in a field of fashion. As the Sashiko artist, ...
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Wallet Sashiko Boro Repair 1

Wallet Sashiko Boro Repair Project

Since 2012, I have been using a Sashiko card-holder as a wallet to carry my debit/credit cards. After repeating putting ...
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Sashiko mending project in one warm day.

(This is a revised article about Sashiko Mending from the website of Sashi.Co & Keiko Futatsuya.) We have more articles ...
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Sashiko Mending Jeans / How I enjoy Sashiko

When I start introducing Sashiko in English about 10 years ago, the word of SASHIKO wasn't popular among the general ...
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Text Links in Mending Jeans Category

1. Mending Jeans in a warm day (Mending) / (Original Article is on Sashi.Co & Keiko Futatsuya)
2. How I enjoy Sashiko with Mending Sashiko Jeans (Mending)
3. Modern Denim Fashion with Sashiko (Direct Stitching)
June 2017 Sashiko Workshop in NYC

How to Start Sashiko | A tutorial from Sashiko Artists

Sashiko  (刺し子) is a form of needlework developed in Japan a couple of centuries ago.

We can find its history in several regions in Japan, where the Japanese had to experience the severe winter. Sashiko used to be a job for women to mend men’s garments over the winter. Both men and women worked as farmers over the summer. Men worked in the wood and women repaired the fabric over the winter. The routine still exist in some places. Our partner, Sashi.Co & Keiko Futatsuya, slows down over summer because many Sashiko artisans work as famers primary.

As long as I know, there is neither the solid definition nor the answer to what Sashiko is. Each regions developed Sashiko in their unique way, and each style of them is very beautiful. My definition of Sashiko is that it is a process of mending the fabric to repair, strengthen and warmth the garment, which family member will wear. Well, let me stop here. I am not writing a book about its history.

However, I believe it is one of my missions to explore what Sashiko is. The exploration will be a big one, so please follow the link if you are interested in understanding it. I am working on some reading materials.

Overview of Sashiko Stitching  / How to stitch

Sashiko transformed itself over the years and centuries.

We now mainly enjoy Sashiko as a decorative form of needlework. The simple stitching with the traditional combination, which is Indigo Dye Fabric and White thread, attract many people. We can find its unique stitchings in tablewares, clothes like jackets or shirts, handbags, and tapestries. I’ve had workshops for quilters, which they loved the taste of Sashiko.

There is no such a thing as “the rule”. You can do Sashiko on any kind of fabric with any color. However, there are efficient and beautiful ways to do stitching based on its history and accumurated wisdom. As a Sashiko artist from surviving traditional family in Japan, I will introduce the traditional and basics of Sashiko.

Tools and Materials to prepare in the beginning.

It is very easy to start. You do not need a huge investment to prepare what you need. Here is a list of things you would need to start. I wrote about the tools we use.

*I wrote an article about the tools we use.

List of things you would need to start

Sashiko 1 Sashiko Thimble Sashiko Pattern
Sashiiko Fabric Boro Sashiko Needle Tracing Tool
  1. Sashiko Thread | Pick a good one
  2. Fabric | Solid Cotton fabric is recommended
  3. Sashiko Needle
  4. Sashiko Thimble
  5. Pattern | Anything you would like to
  6. Tracing tools such as tracing paper or chalk pencil

*Each Link Above goes to our Online Store.

*Click here for little more information for each material.

Preparation

Preparation, either drawing the pattern on the fabric or transferring the pattern onto the fabric, is a very important process. Either way, please make sure that the patterns are strongly visible on the fabric. Once you start doing stitching, the pattern may fade off. In case, reinforce the line accordingly. Having a good pattern on the fabric is a key to accomplish the better result.

If you are using the transferring method from patterns printed on papers, please refer to another article of mine, how to transfer the pattern onto fabric. With online video tutorial, you will be able to grasp the process of transferring the pattern with appropriate tools. If you are drawing the pattern on the fabric with using rulers and pencil, refer to the article about how to draw the symentric patterns (coming soon).

After the pattern in nicely on your fabric, trim your fabric to appropriate size for your project. Let do actual stitching!

Stitching – How to use tools

Among several Sashiko methods, naminui method (Running Stitching) is one of my specialty. I will focus on Naminui on this introduction page. In order to perform Naminui, put the thimble as the picture below show. A round shape facing down, and the thimble is on the middle finger of your dominant hand. Try to practice hold the needle as the picture show. This is the basic and standard figure of how to hold the needle using the unique shaped round thimble.

Before stitching, after practicing the figure, do not forget to thread the needle. If you choose the appropriate needle, it shouldn’t be too difficult to thread through. Of course, you can use threader if you need support. Also, putting a hint of Vaseline on the tip of the thread may help the threading process.

Let’s start stitching

In my workshop, I always say;

“Hold the fabric and needle together with using your thumb and the tip of middle finger. The needle should be on your dominant hand. Then support the fabric with another hand. Move (push) the needle while making stitches”

Then I see confused faces in the classroom. Always.

It is pretty difficult to explain how to make Sashiko stitches in written contents. The standard form is shown in the photo below. I understand that you do not understand by looking at photos.

Since it is difficult to explain in written form, I uploaded several videos how to do Sashiko stitching. I am learning how to make videos, so it has a chance to re-upload the better videos. Check our Youtube channel for the update and more information.

Sashi.Co Youtube Channel

Example with Shippou Pattern

Coming soon.

Tips for the better experience

Making no knots…?

Regular hand-sewing and stitching require a knot at the end of the thread to hold. However, we often avoid making the knots when we start stitching and end stitching. Instead, we make several “over-ray” stitches to hold the thread and fabric. The picture below shows a few stitches which as 2 colors, like pink and yellow, pink and light green. These are over-ray stitching and the Sashiko thread makes it possible to replace the knots. (I believe most of the(I believe most of the regular embroidery thread will not work as knots even if you make several over-ray stitches.)

The “knot-less” stitching makes fabric more smooth, and it is great techniques for projects you need to use both side of fabric. Here are some supporting links to over-ray stitching including an online video tutorial how to make over-ray stitching.

How many stitches should we make?

You may make as many stitches as you want as long as the needle let you do. Some artists makes as many as 30 stitches without smoothing the fabric. The unique method of Naminui and the way to hold the needle and thimble make it possible. When you work on the patterns with straight line (like the picture below) making many stitches will save you time and give you even stitches. When you work on the pattern with circles or curves, try to keep the stitches small and less stitches so you will make smooth and nice curve by stitches.

By the way, the picture above another picture showing the overlay stitching.

Here is a video showing the Naminui Stitching that I make.

Right or Wrong | Any regulation?

I personally believe there is no such a thing as “right” or “wrong” in Sashiko stitching. It isn’t structured tradition like other types of Japanese traditional culture such as “Sado / Tea ceremony” and “Ikebana/flower arrangement art.” After all, Sashiko was merely a stitching custom which the ordinary people practice daily basis. So, do not worry about doing right or wrong. Therefore, there isn’t any regulation. Just enjoy the process of stitching.

Even stitches always give you the good result.

Although there isn’t any regulation, there are a few suggestons you may take into consideration. The first suggestion is about the length of one stitch. There is no standard for the length of Sashiko. No Sashiko tell you that you have to make, let’s say, 1mm length stitches throughout the project. Just try to keep the even stitches throughout your project. Even if you have relatively big stitches for the first line, you may want to keep the same length. Even stitches always give you the good result.

You will be able to adjust the length of stitching based on what your Sashiko project require. Jeans mending require the bigger stitches. A pillow with curve line will require small and precise stitches.

Question. Which is the best Sashiko stitching?

Look at the center of this Sashiko pattern, where 3 lines cross. Which point would be the best Sashiko, either A, B or C?

Some book may say that “A” is the “right” Sashiko and “B” and “C” are not “right” so if you have B and C, you should retry it. In my opinion, B and C are also good Sashiko. Why? Because every line keeps the same length throughout the pattern.

Let’s look at another picture.

This is the exact same pattern from above. Do you even find point A, B and C? Are they that significant when you look from distance? Sashiko tend to have many stitches on the fabric. So small “adjustment” is not necessary. If you have even stitches, the result will get better.

In fact, it is up to your preference after all.

I prefer the Sashiko with “even stitches without adjusting much.” Some people may prefer adjusting stitches with almost perfect pattern looking.The beauty of Sashiko is partically because of its inperfectionism, so I always teach my student to not to worry about the small detail. In stead of redoing the Sashiko, I will move on to another project so you can stitch more and more. Trust me. If you keep the even stitches with appropriate length for your project, the result will be great.

Sashiko Appendix

A series of my exploration to Sashiko history and definition.

More brief information for materials.

Thread

Sashiko Thread

I strongly recommend using “Sashiko thread” for the best results. Sashiko requires a series of think and unique stitches for better appearance as well as strengthing the fabric simultaneously. The regular embroidery floss may be a bit inappropriate for its purpose. You can find more information and articles about Sashiko thread we prefer in our website.

Fabric

Sashiko Fabric

Cotton Fabric is always a good choice for Sashiko. We have used other types of fabric such as silk and linen. However, the cotton fabric will result in the beautiful stitches. Heavy fabric, such as hard denim, may be difficult for the beginners since it requires finger power to push the needle. Light fabric, such as cotton poplin, may require you some practice because of its thinness. The thin fabric is perfect material for stitching double layers. There are more information and articles about the fabric for Sashiko.

  • About preferable fabric for Sashiko stitching

Needle

Picking a good needle is a very important process.

For the better result, the needles should be long enough to hold several stitches. The needle I recommend, which is the one I use, has about 5 cm (2-inch) length. It is longer than usual hand sewing needle. I explain why you need this long needle in other articles and also in a youtube video. The needle should have a relatively big eye for thicker thread. At the last, the needle should be tough enough to stitch the several layers of fabric, and yet flexible enough to keep several stitches.

Thimble

Sashiko thimble

A thimble surprises many workshop participants. This round shape made from metal thimble are not common in other types of stitching. It requires a lot of practice to get used to making stitches with this thimble. One of my workshops focuses on how to use this thimble. Learning how to use the thimble will speed up your stitching and will give you the better result.

Pattern

Any patterns would be great on Sashiko stitching. Japanese geometric patterns are the all-time favorite, but we also get inspiration from other stitching and embroidery culture. It is always a good idea to start with basic and fundamental. In order to learn Sashiko basic, I recommend using some of Japanese geometric patterns. They are available in our online store for download.

Traditional Geometric Patterns
Traditional Geometric Patterns

Modified Geometric Patterns
Modified Geometric Patterns
  • Patterns for Sashiko? What is good and what is bad?

Tracing tools

Sashiko tracing tool

At last, but not the least, getting the appropriate tools for tracing the pattern is another very important process. There are no needs to get some special tracing tools. Chalk pencil, a tracing wheel, safety pins, and so on from a local hobby store would be just fine. I learned that some supplies and tools are difficult to get in the United States, so here is a list of things we carry in our inventory.

  • Carbon Paper (Transfer Paper)
  • Mylar Paper (Poly Sheet)

For the tutorial how to transfer the pattern onto the fabric, please refer the other articles I wrote as well as the youtube video. I also sell the kit to practice how to transfer the pattern. You can use the Indigo Dye fabric for Sashiko after you practiced transferring pattern onto the fabric.

Update 2019 Fall

Thank you very much for reading a long article. I wrote this article about 2 years ago (in 2017), and there are many updates since. One of the biggest update is the Online Sashiko Class.

In addition to the well-reviewed In-person Sashiko Workshop, we now offer the Online Sashiko Class to learn the core and basic of Sashiko. I can follow up on how you would do Sashiko as we do.

I look forward to meeting you there, either In-person or Online (I have live session to meet, too).