How to make Sashiko thread Bobbin (Itomaki)

Sashiko thread is different from regular embroidery thread. Therefore, Sashiko Thread requires a special attention to store it in a good condition. Otherwise, it ends up with entangled thread. (Don’t let your cat to play. It will make a perfect ball.) This is a tutorial how to make Sashiko Thread Bobbin (Itomaki) for enjoying Sashiko thread until the end.

 

Difference in Sashiko Threads

Sashiko Thread Bobbin 1

 

There are many kinds of embroidery thread. Even speaking about Sashiko thread only, there are many options available in the market. We strongly recommend to get a nice heavy cotton thread, designed for Sashiko purpose. We use Sashiko thread manufactured by Coron, and we have been very happy with the result. Sashiko requires you a lot of time and effort. We want you to have the good result.

 

Some Sashiko threads are available on our webstore, our Etsy store, and even in Amazon Marketplace.

 

Our Sashiko thread is consisted by 6 thin embroidery threads, twisted in a unique way to create beautiful stitches.

The price looks a bit expensive, but considering the amount of thread (145 meters / 475 feets length) per skein, I believe the price is reasonable in the market in comparison to the other thread by Olympus or the other vendors. Some customer mention that it is too long to consume a skein. When you learn how to do Sashiko stitch in our Sashi.Co way, you would need more skeins of thread. When you follow my workshop, your stitching speed would increase by a lot, and it means you need more thread.

 

The easiest way to avoid the entangled thread

The easiest way to avoid the entangled thread is to cut the thread as a picture show below. Then, taping the edge of thread bundle will not let thread entangled easily. Since this process takes only a minute or so, I introduce this method in my workshops. The cut thread also have a good length to practice regular Asano-ha patterns. When you need a single line of thread, you pull one thread out from the bundle by holding the taping edge.

 

Sashiko Thread bobbin 2

 

However, if you can invest your time to make Sashiko thread bobbin, I would recommend you to do so. I wish I could share this in the workshops, but it will take much longer and my workshops focus on Sashiko stitching / Sashiko mending, not making the Sashiko thread bobbin.

 

Therefore, I present a short tutorial video how to make a Sashiko thread Bobbin.

 

 

Invest some time to make Sashiko Thread Bobbin

Sashiko Thread Bobbin

 

I hope the tutorial video is clear enough to share how to make Sashiko Thread bobbin. Please leave the comments on Youtube if you have questions regarding this topic.

I don’t know how to call the blue thread holder introduced in the video. Is it called “a thread skeiner…?” It doesn’t have to rotate. As picture show below, ask someone to hold the skein of thread is another option. Or you could use two polls, too. You can purchase the blue plastic wheel from us if you are interested. We have 2 of these in stock. (Be advised that the wheel I use is pretty fragile… if you know any better product, please let me know!)

 

 

The biggest advantage of making Sashiko Thread Bobbin is that you can decide the length of thread you use for the project, without wasting the remaining thread. Another reason I make bobbins is that they look very beautiful and give me an inspiration. The various color of Sashiko thread makes me excited and calm simultaneously. It is probably the scenery I was grown up with.

 

 

I would like to invest some money on the Bobbin holder (The brown thick paper I introduce on the video / The cool designed board shown in the photo above). Wait for another update and join me if I start the “Bobbin Holder Making Project.”
Thank you for watching the video / reading our tutorial.

 

Enjoy Sashiko!

How to transfer Sashiko Patterns on to the fabric

People often have a question how to transfer Sashiko patterns onto the fabric. Yes. Sashiko isn’t always about stitching. Preparing the fabric properly is a very important aspect of Sashiko.

 

Here is a tutorial how to transfer Sashiko Patterns by using a carbon paper

An easy and accurate way to transfer Sashiko patterns is to use a carbon (transfer) paper. Using proper tools will result in beautiful patterns on fabric. Here is a list of tools and supplies you need to follow this tutorial.

  • Fabric *1
  • Chakopee Carbon Paper (Transfer Paper) *2
  • Mylar Paper *3
  • Pattern *4

 

  1. We, as Sashi.Co, mostly transfer pattern on the back side of fabric
  2. We use Japanese Mylar paper. However, any Cello/Poly paper should work. It should be strong enough to hold the pressure (prevent being torn.)
  3. A regular copy paper is fine. Since tracing require a strong pressure, the pattern paper will be discarded after a single usage. 

 

The necessary materials above are available on this website. Check the purchase list.

 

Layer fabric and papers in proper order

 

How to transfer Sashiko Patterns on to Fabric _1

How to transfer Sashiko Patterns on to Fabric _3

 

A video will explain about the layers well, but here is the order of the layer. The number is the order to place the fabric and/or papers on the table. (Bottom to Up after completing it)

  1. Fabric
  2. Chakopee Paper (Shinning side facing down to fabric)
  3. Mylar paper
  4. pattern

 

Securing the all 4 layers. A tracing process with strong pressure can shift any layers.

 

How to transfer Sashiko Patterns on to Fabric _4

 

Make sure to pin the 4 layers you made now. I usually use safety pins, but any kind of pin should work. Even clips would be fine as long as the layers are secured from shifting. Another tip is to NOT to pin it at one corner so that you can check the pattern in the middle of tracing without shifting the pattern.

Transfer Sashiko pattern by Tracing

How to transfer Sashiko Patterns on to Fabric _5

 

I usually use a red-colored ballpoint pen to distinguish the line I traced. You may use any kind of pen (a pencil may be weak for the required pressure), and tracing tools such as a tracing wheel. Make sure to trace strongly enough to push the tracing paper onto the fabric. You may check the results in the process untiil you understand that required pressure. The pressure is depended on the Cello paper you choose.

 

Check the result. Support the weak transfer.

How to transfer Sashiko Patterns on to Fabric _6

 

You should see the white line on the fabric. (You may see different color if you purchase the different tracing paper.)

If you find some lines with weaker chalk transfer, then use a white pencil (or chalk pencil) to support the line. In the process of Sashiko, the pattern may vanish because of sweat from hands or friction of fabric. Use the pencil as you need.

 

And Sashiko Stitch!!

Sashiko Stitching

 

After that, Enjoy the Sashiko Stitching!

Keep it in your mind that I usually transfer the pattern on the back of the fabric. Since the patterns will be washed away, you can, of course, transfer the pattern on the front side. It is up to you, but for some reasons, I keep transferring the patterns on the back.

 

Leave the comments on Youtube Video if you have questions about transferring the pattern. I will try my best to answer it.

 

Speech at FIT 2

Great questions in F.I.T Speech / Sashiko Presentation

More people are interested in Sashiko presentation, more than I thought.

 

I received many great questions in Sashiko Presentation. Now I need to answer after thinking through it.

 
To be honest, I didn’t think that people would be so interested in Sashiko presentation. Therefore, I tried to make it fun, to entertain the audience rather than boring “informative” presentation. I may have made a mistake. I probably should have made Sashiko presentation more informative and specific about Sashiko.

 

 

Sashiko Presentation

 

Regardless, I enjoyed the Sashiko presentation VERY MUCH. The audience made a nice welcoming atmosphere. I sincerely appreciate Joshua, who invited me, to Faces and Places in Fashion, at Fashion Institute of Technology.

 

Answering Questions is my responsibility

 

I feel that I didn’t answer to all great questions with my best possible answers. So I will use this website to share the questions from the audience and my sincere answer. I don’t have to make a joke to escape from tension (I always try to make people laugh when I am nervous on stage….)

 

I am not a professional designer or tailor, but I practice Sashiko as the professional.

Since there is an interest in Sashiko, it is my responsibility to share the answer. In other words, this could be my contribution to the society.

 

I will try to remember and list all the questions I received. However, if you happened to be one of the audiences of my Sashiko presentation, and found that I miss the question, please comment on any posts. I will definitely follow up. The blog will be in the category of Sashiko Q&A.

 

A Power of Repurpose.

The theme of my Sashiko presentation was “A Power of Repurpose”

Fabric gets value when we repurpose it; when we repair it with appreciation. I believe Sashiko is a process of repurposing the fabric. The power of purpose apply not only to the fabrics, but also everything around you, including human.

 

Making a public speech about Sashiko may be my life-work to introduce what Sashiko is, and how beautiful “repurpose” can be.

 

 

Please contact me if you are interested in my speech. I would love to talk to you and your friends.

Speech at FIT 2

Thank you for the Speech @ FIT & Workshops

I appreciate all the opportunities I received over this weekend; the Speech @ FIT and the Sashiko workshops at BTJ as well as Pioneer Works. Stupid of me, I just realized that my website here (on the business card you may have gotten) started a few weeks ago. So here is a quick note to share how I am grateful to meet you.

[I revised the post.]

 

Speech @ FIT

 

I updated a lot of information after Speech @ FIT

I will keep updating the information regarding Sashiko here. However, you can get the same information from my mother’s website here.

You can check all of the information I am sharing on this website, Upcylcestitches.com. Also, my mother’s project, Sashi.Co & Keiko Futatsuya carries similar information. If you reside outside of U.S.A, Sashi.Co Webstore will be better store to shop.

 

*The difference between “www.sashico.com” and “upcyclestitches.com” is that Sashico.com target to all the English readers, meanwhile this website targeted to mainly US residence.

 

Get the latest information from us.

 

The best way to get information from us is to receive the newsletter. We do not send the marketing e-mails much. Whenever the new product, new service, or new schedule for Sashiko workshop are up, I will send you the newsletter to inform the readers. Please subscribe the newsletter!

 

Other SNS are also a good resource. Find us on Facebook and Instagram.

Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/KeikoSashico/

Instagram : https://www.instagram.com/sashi.co/

Sashiko Workshops

We proudly host Sashiko workshops, mainly in NYC / Brooklyn Area. The workshops would be the unique opportunity to experience traditional Sashiko. We have some articles and video tutorials on this website, joining the workshop would be the best way to learn what I am trying to share. Curious Corners LLC will represent me while I am not in the NYC / Brooklyn area, so follow them as well so you won’t miss the opportunities.

 

Best Regards,

Atsushi Futatsuya

1883 INDIGO DYEING | Japanese Natural Dye Artist

 

Natural Dye Artist

The founder and producer of 1883 Indigo.Dyeing., Takeshi Udo, enjoy Natural Botanical Dye.

 

Takeshi Udo

He was born in a small village in the mountain in 1983.  Both his parents are the craftsmen. His father was a furniture upholsterer and his mother, she’s still on active, is a dyer. Because of such home environment, he has been familiar with making something by hands and liked to create things.

After he graduated the high school in his hometown, he went over to the U.S and he had spent about 5 years there. Then he came back to Japan and started to live in Kyoto.  In Kyoto, he had worked for textile design studio for about 4 years.  From that experience, he got interested in fashion and fabrics.

In 2015, he decided to learn dye from his mother and started to create natural-dyed product under the name of 1883.  He always has wanted to make something by his hand for a long time, and he finally found “the something” has been very close to him.

1883

1883 is named after a year when the chemical structure of Indigo was established.  As it happens, it’s exactly 100 years from Takeshi’s birth year.  1883’s products are all natural and hand dyed using indigos, herbs and seasonal plants.  Some of those plants are grown in Takeshi’s parents’s garden.
The main products of 1883 are scarves and stoles.  For my products, Takeshi selected high quality and pleasant feel fabrics.  They are made from organic cotton, linen, silk and wool and most of them are weave in Japan.  Some products are hand stitched.  Takeshi wants you to feel the warmth of the handmade and blessing colors of nature from 1883’s works.

2017 Sashiko Workshops | Start Sashiko with us

Upcycle Stitches LLC offer various Sashiko workshops in NYC/Brooklyn area. The list for the year of 2017 Sashiko Workshops is available on this website. The workshops are the hands-on opportunity to learn Sashiko techniques from experienced Sashiko artist, Atsushi Futatsuya. Visit the web to register your seat here.

“Curious Corner / Sashiko Workshops”

 

2017 Sashiko Workshops

Read more about our Hands-on Sashiko Workshops

Read this article to learn what you can expect to our HandsOn Sashiko Workshops.

Our goal through this website is to share our techniques and information. However, it is the best way to meet the instructors and learn from them. The workshops aren’t like the lecture you would just listen to the talking. You would move your hands to learn how to use the Sashiko thimble and needles, The instructor will sit down next to you and put hands on your hands to teach if necessary.

 

Although there is not “right” technique for the Sashiko stitching, we are proud of our accumulation of techniques and its uniqueness. I believe that, once you master our stitching method, the stitching process will speed up and you can enjoy more Sashiko project. As a result, your stitching skill will improve. The more you enjoy the Sashiko project, the better your stitching looks.

 

Contact us if you have any questions regarding Sashiko Workshops.

 

The year of 2017 Sashiko Workshops

Now Registering

Workshops at Calliope NYC

Location: 

Calliope
349 West 12th St. (between Washington & Greenwich Sts)
West Village, NYC

  • Saturday, June 24
  • Sunday, June 25

 

Completed

Location:

@ 20 Grattan St. Brooklyn, NY 11206

  • Friday, Feb 24
  • Saturday, Feb 25 
  • Monday, Feb 27
*Available only for those who have taken Sashiko Stitching class. 

 

@ Workshop at Pioneer Works (Red Hook, Brooklyn)

Location:

159 Pioneer St. Brooklyn, NY

pioneerworks.org 

  • Sunday, Feb 26