How to Avoid Tangling Sashiko Thread

How to avoid Tangling Sashiko Thread

The “Sashiko Thread (we recommend)” is specifically designed for the Sashiko stitching. Therefore, a skein of thread may get tangled when the thread is not well-handled. It is not difficult to keep the Sashiko thread in a good shape. Here are several ways to avoid an unfortunate accident: Tangling Sashiko Thread.

In 2020, I made a video of one of the easiest way to keep the Sashiko Thread in a good shape. This is a follow-up article for the video with the transcription.


Avoid Tangling Sashiko Thread

Script of the video of Avoid Tangling Sashiko Thread

As always, instead of adding caption on the video, I share the script of the video’s contents. As soon as I get resources/funds to add the caption, I will work on it. Until that, the script will be helpful for some of you.


Hello.

Thank you for watching our videos to learn what Sashiko is for us. One of frequent questions I receive is how to keep the thread in a good condition. Well, more francky speaking, it is about how to avoid an unfortunate accident – which is getting the thread tangled. I hope this video will help you to prevent the sad experience. 

 

You would need, Good Sashiko thread that we recommend, scissors, and scotch tape. This is more like a “quick solution”. To learn other ways to keep the thread in a good condition, please check other 2 videos talking about making the thread bobbins & thread cards. The link is listed on the description.




Let’s talk about Sashiko Thread here again.

 

I recommend mainly these Sashiko threads. I use the thread on the left, the large skein one, for most of my Sashiko projects. We have many colors both synthetic dye and natural dye. 

 

I started using the thread on the right side, the small skein, to answer some requests from audiences who wish to use the thinner threads. After using them for a year or so, and repeating tries and errors, we are happy to recommend this thinner thread as well.

 

All of the Sashiko threads we have on our website, upcyclestitches.com are good for Sashiko stitching. 

 

One of the characterics of Good Sashiko thread for Sashiko Stitching means the threads have very unique twists. As I have been introducing the difference between Sashiko thread & other types of threads, there are reasons we call it “Sashiko thread”. Thread does make a difference, thread does matter.

 

If you are wondering why your stitches do not look like ours, the thread may be the quick remedy for your question.

 

Please also check another video about “what is the difference between Sashiko thread and other thread”. The link is on the description as well.



Because of the unique twist, the thread is, unfortunately, very easy to get tangled. The  threads are packaged as one-continuous threads, either 145 meter or 40 meters. Therefore, when we try to pull the thread without any preparation, it will most likely be a tangled thread ball. The tangled thread ball is still usable for Sashiko stitching. However, it will be a lot more troublesome. 

 

So, Let’s jump to the main topic today. Here is a quick & easy solution for that.



First, un-skein the thread to one big loop. //This is how we receive the thread from the thread manufacturer (before making them as a skein).// The one-continuous thread is rounded and stopped by the small loop. 

 

(Instead of cutting this small thread stopper off and starting to use and get tangled). You may ignore the small loop thread stopper and cut the thread at any point of the loop as the video shows. It is like a one loop of thread to one bunch of threads. After you cut the thread once, please tape the both ends so that threads will not separate by themselves. 

 

After securing the both ends of threads, you may pull one thread out from the bunch of threads. Pulling the thread shouldn’t be difficult at all, and the other bunch of threads will not be tangled at all because of the secured edges with scotch tape. 

 

After you pull the one thread, you may use a paper bobbin to keep the threads in a good shape. (The paper bobbin can be anything – a piece of cardboard is perfectly fine. Not necessary but recommended). 




By the way, this is not related to the main topic of how to avoid an unfortunate accident of tangled thread, I will introduce how the skein is made out of the thread loop. It may not be something new or unique for those who are familiar with thread. However, it is good to share as much information as possible in order to pass down the culture, I believe.



When we dye the Sashiko thread, we cannot dye the thread in a form of skein.We dye thread with the thread in a form of big loop, which is the same form right before the cutting that I introduced in this video.



After thread dyeing is completed, we manually make a skein as the video shows. Dyeing is manually done by hands. Making skeins is manually done by hands. Packaging them is also manually done by hands. It would be appreciated if you could understand the subtle difference of each item. 



There are many reasons why we do not automate the process, but one significant reason is that we would like to care what we make. We would like to know what we are offering.





Let me share a fable, short story.

 

A company made a goal to make 10,000 items, and sell it to 10,000 customers. In order to get 100% satisfaction from a customer, the company decided to make 10,010 items with a 0.1% defect rate. The number is the logic. If there is a 0.1% of defect rate, we have to prepare to replace it. 

 

This is a very true statement in terms of productivity.

 

However, a Japanese company decided to make the defect rate to 0% – although it certainly is inefficient to do so. They decided to make 10,000 items with no defective items – and the productivity would go down because of this goal.

 

The point here is not the power of statistics. 

If you are interested, please pause the video here and try to think why the Japanese came up with the inefficient goal.



The Japanese company thought like this.

Yes, the deficient rate is only 0.1%. 10 items over 10,000 items are not that significant. However, for a customer, 1 defective item is 100% defective. It is our identity to deliver the 100% product to the 100% customers. 

 

I feel the same way.

Therefore, we try to do everything manually with care as much as possible.



Alright. Let’s come back to the main topic.

As you have been watching, the same process of cutting one place of thread loop, goes to the bigger skein as well. The same process. The same idea.

 

Some may want to cut the threads with the desirable length for each Sashiko project. This may not be the ideal solution for those who wish to have specific length in the Sashiko stitching. Also, when we take care of the variegated color thread, this may not be the ideal solution (because, sometimes, we want to have the continuous colors as variegated.)

 

If you wish to not to cut the thread as I shared in this video, please check the other 2 videos of how to make thread bobbins & thread balls.



I understand that some of us do not want to tape the edge. 

In that case, we can brade the threads. I am not very good at brading the thread, but here we go.

 

In braiding, we need to cut the small loop off. It can be before or after cutting the thread’s big loop. The small loop can be a part of the main 145 meter continuous thread. So make sure to cut it off.

 

Then, fold the thread into half, and hang it on the wall or s-shape hanger. 

 

After that, you may know better. The same way to make a brading with long hair. After completion of the brade, you may pull 1 thread from the top of the braided thread. 

 

Here I show the exact same process with another same Sashiko thread, just a different color, pink. I find it difficult to explain it in words. I hope the video of me actually doing is a helpful resource.

 

For the idea of brading, It may be a good idea to braid several colors of Sashiko thread together.

Let’s look at it again for the last time. Cut the small loop of the thread off. Then, cut one point of threads to make a bunch of threads. Instead of taping the edges, fold the threads into half and hang it somewhere. I hereby combined the white & pink thread together.

 

After this, it is the matter of practicing the brading. 



Alright. 

This is the end of the video.

I hope this video will help you to avoid the sad and unfortunate accident. It is always good to have a bunch of Sashiko threads ready for your stitching. 

 

We also have some “thread cards” pre-prepared. 

For more information about the products we offer, please visit upcyclestitches.com

 

(The script ends here for How to Avoid Tangling Sashiko Thread)


Other methods to avoid tangling Sashiko Thread

For more information, please visit our Youtube Channel.

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