Sashiko Rules Asanoha Pattern

Sashiko Rules | Right & Wrong in Sashiko Stitching?

One of the frequent questions I receive when I actually show my Sashiko stitching is that I am not following the “correct way of Sashiko.” In conclusion, I believe that there is not such a thing as Sashiko Rules. Therefore, there is No “right” and “wrong” in Sashiko Stitching. No regulations. No Bad Sashiko.

What I teach & share is a technique (hint) to make the better Sashiko, more beautiful Stitches, and Sashiko stitching with comfortable hand-movement. It is an advice, not the rule. It is always your choice to follow any information. I just simply prefer the way my Sashiko goes.

 

 

 

Should NOT lines cross in Sashiko Rules…?

“I learned that you should not cross the lines with stitches.”

Yes. Some Sashiko books & articles online suggested not to cross the stitches when the 2 or more lines cross. You may have understood that it i the absolutely bad thing to do to make the line crossed.

 

Me? I don’t really pay attention when the lines cross. What I pay attention to is if I can keep the same length of beautiful stitches. Here is a reason below.

 

Which Asano-ha do you prefer?

The reason is pretty simple. Which Asano-ha Sashiko patterns do you prefer?

I “can” follow the so-called the Sashiko rules of Asanoha pattern Sashiko to not to cross the lines. However, the Sashiko following the specific length and modify it leave the feeling of “artificial.” I would like to decide the size of stitching based on the project theme, not based on the Sashiko rules or regulations which someone made. I simply prefer the center or right Sashiko pieces on the photo. That’s why I keep saying there is no such a thing as Sasiko Rules.

 

Sashiko Rules Asanoha Pattern

 

Also, “No Rules Sashiko” is another reason I strongly recommend to learn how to transfer the patterns onto the fabric by yourself.

It is easier to purchase the “pattern pre-printed fabric” to have good Sashiko time. However, by learning how to draw & transfer the Sashiko pattern on the fabric, you will have the infinite possibility of your Sashiko project. Again, there are no rules. You can do whatever you want.

 

 

Sashiko is too ordinary to be the way of art.

 

Besides my personal preferences, I have several reasons for my belief that there is no rule for Sashiko.

Unlike Ikebana (Flower Art) and Chano-Yu (Tea Ceremony) which became considered as the way of Japanese art, Sashiko was too ordinary for many people to give it art status. As long as I know, there is no school for Sashiko, and there isn’t an organization to offer the types of certification. Sashiko was too ordinary for the Japanese to consider as the art.

 

In fact, the Boro, in form of the result of continuous Sashiko stitching, represented the poverty, and it was shameful for the Japanese to own so much Boros in their house. The people even buried the Boro fabric under the ground to hide the shame.

Sashiko Rules Boro

 

Since Sashiko was too ordinal, there are many kinds of Sashiko in Japan. I would say, the rural location with snowy winter & surrounded by mountain (or ocean) have the Sashiko culture or similar to that. The limited logistic to the fabric supply & limited opportunity for the winter labor developed the culture of Sashiko. In Japan, as you can see on the map, there are many locations that fulfill the requirement to be “Sashiko Place.” 

 

It is simple. Therefore you can make your own Sashiko.

 

It is interesting to see people disappointed when I tell them that there is no rule in Sashiko.

Well. Sometimes, it is easier to learn the new craft when rules and regulation limit your ideas. It is easier to follow the direction rather than creating your new one. I understand that. I try to answer the market demands by creating the DIY Sashiko kit and starter kit.

 

You may have some fancy image in Sashiko.

In reality, Sashiko is merely a technique of hand-stitching the Japanese developed from poverty. I respect Sashiko. However, I believe Sashiko shouldn’t something you should suffer to learn for decades. It is very simple. Therefore, there is infinite of possibility to apply Sashiko to any other crafting, embroidery, and any kinds of project. My goal is to share the enjoyment of Sashiko. The mindfulness of hand-stitching, and the beauty of Sashiko & Boros.

 

I respect all the Sashiko works in the world. I may mention my preferences. However, I strongly believe there is no such a thing as “Wrong Sashiko” and “Correct Sashiko.”

I hope you enjoy Sashiko more with ease in mind.

 

4 thoughts to “Sashiko Rules | Right & Wrong in Sashiko Stitching?”

  1. You made my day… its one question less in my mind, thats for sure the way to be creative and enjoy the possibilities of sashiko-
    So, for me, from now on, there is no such a thing as “Wrong Sashiko” and “Correct Sashiko!”

    I will enjoy Sashiko with ease in mind!
    Thanks so much,
    mar

    1. My pleasure Margarida,

      Enjoy Sashiko without worrying the “rules.” I will share how to do it so you can “add” the techniques to your ability. I hope you received my reply 🙂 Looking forward to supporting you in Sashiko Journey!

      1. Yes I received it, thanks so much!
        I’m so happy to have your support!
        Best wishes from Lisbon, Portugal
        Margarida

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.