Sashiko Asanoha Fukin Cover

Sashiko Asanoha Fukin | How to Sashiko in Order

Sashiko Fukin (刺し子ふきん)is one of the most popular Sashiko items in Japan. Fukin means a sampler or a dish-cloth. The Japanese use this square piece of white cloth to cover the food, wipe the dishes, and other many kitchen activities. Here is a sample of How to Sashiko Asanoha Fukin with video of me stitching and the photos of each step. There is no “right” way to proceed the stitching. It is merely a sample but would be useful when you work on the Sashiko Stitching with Asano-ha pattern.

 

 

Preparation |  Sashiko Asanoha Fukin

Sarashi (晒)is a Japanese thin cotton fabric. (I plan to have them in stock soon).

We prefer to make Sashiko with the double layers. After drawing (transferring) the pattern, secure the two layers with safety pins or such.

 

Sashiko Asanoha Fukin 1

 

Steps of How to Sashiko Asanoha Fukin

The core concept of making a good Sashiko Fukin is to have the “one-stroke” stitching. The optimal (the most efficient) way to stitch vary from a pattern to pattern.

 

Step.1 | Around of Sashiko Asanoha Fukin

Stitch around the corner. Then, the safety pins can be removed.

Sashiko Asanoha Fukin 0

 

Step.2 | Diagonal Lines

Find the longest line, which happens to be the diagonal lines. Enjoy running stitch without cutting the thread until the thread runs out.

 

Sashiko Asanoha Fukin 2

 

Use “Kasane” to continue.

 

Sashiko Asanoha Fukin 4

 

Step.3 | Small Zigzag Lines

After enjoying the long diagonal lines, then move to the small zigzag lines.

 

Step.4 | In-between Lines

Fill the leftovers with using Kasane.

Sashiko Asanoha Fukin 6

Sashiko Asanoha Fukin 5

 

Step Extra | Enjoy addition

The Fukin Project complete with the step.4

However, I decided to continue the process by adding another color to make the double stitches to enjoy the difference between dark Indigo & Light Indigo.

 

Sashiko Asanoha Fukin 7    

 

 

Join our community by taking our Workshops

Sashiko is a process of simple stitching. However, without proper basics, it could be confusing and difficult to enjoy. Upcycle Stitches LLC & Atsushi offer the Sashiko Workshop in NYC and Online. Please consider joining our community where you can learn not only how to stitch these beautiful Japanese geometric pattern but also connect to a community where people share the same great passion to Sashiko.

 

  1. Sashiko Stitching Workshops in NYC
  2. Sashiko Online Workshops 

 

Sashiko Workshops September 2018

 

Some of the tutorials are available online, Youtube.

How to make Sashiko thread Bobbin (Itomaki)

Sashiko thread is different from regular embroidery thread. Therefore, Sashiko Thread requires a special attention to store it in a good condition. Otherwise, it ends up with entangled thread. (Don’t let your cat to play. It will make a perfect ball.) This is a tutorial how to make Sashiko Thread Bobbin (Itomaki) for enjoying Sashiko thread until the end.

 

Difference in Sashiko Threads

Sashiko Thread Bobbin 1

 

There are many kinds of embroidery thread. Even speaking about Sashiko thread only, there are many options available in the market. We strongly recommend to get a nice heavy cotton thread, designed for Sashiko purpose. We use Sashiko thread manufactured by Coron, and we have been very happy with the result. Sashiko requires you a lot of time and effort. We want you to have the good result.

 

Some Sashiko threads are available on our webstore, our Etsy store, and even in Amazon Marketplace.

 

Our Sashiko thread is consisted by 6 thin embroidery threads, twisted in a unique way to create beautiful stitches.

The price looks a bit expensive, but considering the amount of thread (145 meters / 475 feets length) per skein, I believe the price is reasonable in the market in comparison to the other thread by Olympus or the other vendors. Some customer mention that it is too long to consume a skein. When you learn how to do Sashiko stitch in our Sashi.Co way, you would need more skeins of thread. When you follow my workshop, your stitching speed would increase by a lot, and it means you need more thread.

 

The easiest way to avoid the entangled thread

The easiest way to avoid the entangled thread is to cut the thread as a picture show below. Then, taping the edge of thread bundle will not let thread entangled easily. Since this process takes only a minute or so, I introduce this method in my workshops. The cut thread also have a good length to practice regular Asano-ha patterns. When you need a single line of thread, you pull one thread out from the bundle by holding the taping edge.

 

Sashiko Thread bobbin 2

 

However, if you can invest your time to make Sashiko thread bobbin, I would recommend you to do so. I wish I could share this in the workshops, but it will take much longer and my workshops focus on Sashiko stitching / Sashiko mending, not making the Sashiko thread bobbin.

 

Therefore, I present a short tutorial video how to make a Sashiko thread Bobbin.

 

 

Invest some time to make Sashiko Thread Bobbin

Sashiko Thread Bobbin

 

I hope the tutorial video is clear enough to share how to make Sashiko Thread bobbin. Please leave the comments on Youtube if you have questions regarding this topic.

I don’t know how to call the blue thread holder introduced in the video. Is it called “a thread skeiner…?” It doesn’t have to rotate. As picture show below, ask someone to hold the skein of thread is another option. Or you could use two polls, too. You can purchase the blue plastic wheel from us if you are interested. We have 2 of these in stock. (Be advised that the wheel I use is pretty fragile… if you know any better product, please let me know!)

 

 

The biggest advantage of making Sashiko Thread Bobbin is that you can decide the length of thread you use for the project, without wasting the remaining thread. Another reason I make bobbins is that they look very beautiful and give me an inspiration. The various color of Sashiko thread makes me excited and calm simultaneously. It is probably the scenery I was grown up with.

 

 

I would like to invest some money on the Bobbin holder (The brown thick paper I introduce on the video / The cool designed board shown in the photo above). Wait for another update and join me if I start the “Bobbin Holder Making Project.”
Thank you for watching the video / reading our tutorial.

 

Enjoy Sashiko!

How to transfer Sashiko Patterns on to the fabric

People often have a question how to transfer Sashiko patterns onto the fabric. Yes. Sashiko isn’t always about stitching. Preparing the fabric properly is a very important aspect of Sashiko.

 

Here is a tutorial how to transfer Sashiko Patterns by using a carbon paper

An easy and accurate way to transfer Sashiko patterns is to use a carbon (transfer) paper. Using proper tools will result in beautiful patterns on fabric. Here is a list of tools and supplies you need to follow this tutorial.

  • Fabric *1
  • Chakopee Carbon Paper (Transfer Paper) *2
  • Mylar Paper *3
  • Pattern *4

 

  1. We, as Sashi.Co, mostly transfer pattern on the back side of fabric
  2. Chakopee is available for purchase on this website.
  3. We use Japanese Mylar paper. However, any Cello/Poly paper should work. It should be strong enough to hold the pressure (prevent being torn.)
  4. A regular copy paper is fine. Since tracing require a strong pressure, the pattern paper will be discarded after a single usage. 

 

Layer fabric and papers in proper order

 

How to transfer Sashiko Patterns on to Fabric _1

How to transfer Sashiko Patterns on to Fabric _3

 

A video will explain about the layers well, but here is the order of the layer. The number is the order to place the fabric and/or papers on the table. (Bottom to Up after completing it)

  1. Fabric
  2. Chakopee Paper (Shinning side facing down to fabric)
  3. Mylar paper
  4. pattern

 

Securing the all 4 layers. A tracing process with strong pressure can shift any layers.

 

How to transfer Sashiko Patterns on to Fabric _4

 

Make sure to pin the 4 layers you made now. I usually use safety pins, but any kind of pin should work. Even clips would be fine as long as the layers are secured from shifting. Another tip is to NOT to pin it at one corner so that you can check the pattern in the middle of tracing without shifting the pattern.

Transfer Sashiko pattern by Tracing

How to transfer Sashiko Patterns on to Fabric _5

 

I usually use a red-colored ballpoint pen to distinguish the line I traced. You may use any kind of pen (a pencil may be weak for the required pressure), and tracing tools such as a tracing wheel. Make sure to trace strongly enough to push the tracing paper onto the fabric. You may check the results in the process untiil you understand that required pressure. The pressure is depended on the Cello paper you choose.

 

Check the result. Support the weak transfer.

How to transfer Sashiko Patterns on to Fabric _6

 

You should see the white line on the fabric. (You may see different color if you purchase the different tracing paper.)

If you find some lines with weaker chalk transfer, then use a white pencil (or chalk pencil) to support the line. In the process of Sashiko, the pattern may vanish because of sweat from hands or friction of fabric. Use the pencil as you need.

 

And Sashiko Stitch!!

Sashiko Stitching

 

After that, Enjoy the Sashiko Stitching!

Keep it in your mind that I usually transfer the pattern on the back of the fabric. Since the patterns will be washed away, you can, of course, transfer the pattern on the front side. It is up to you, but for some reasons, I keep transferring the patterns on the back.

 

Leave the comments on Youtube Video if you have questions about transferring the pattern. I will try my best to answer it.